Wednesday, November 19, 2008

Punishment as Treatment

Because [preventing a determined person from committing suicide] is impossible, psychiatrists enjoy (if that is the right word) virtually unlimited professional discretion to employ the most destructive suicide-prevention measures imaginable, provided the measures are called "treatments." The authoritative American Handbook of Psychiatry (1959 edition) endorsed lobotomy "for patients who are threatened with disability or suicide and for whom no other method seems likely to relieve or restore them." In the 1974 edition, lobotomy was replaced by electroshock treatment administered in sufficient doses to destroy the subject's will to kill himself: "[W]e do advocate its initial use for one type of patient, the agitated patient, often middle-aged and usually a man, who presents frank suicidal intention. We give ECT [electroconvulsive therapy] to such a patient . . . daily until mental confusion supervenes and reduces the ability of the patient to carry out his suicidal drive."

Thomas Szasz, Fatal Freedom: The Ethics and Politics of Suicide, pp. 56-57 (citations omitted).

1 comment:


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    www.imarksweb.org

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